baxter_ymodel
T. Caldwell, D. Coleman, N. Correll (2014): Robotic Manipulation for Identification of Flexible Objects. In: International Symposium on Experimental Robotics (ISER), Marrakech, Morocco, 2014.

This paper provides preliminary insight into stiff ness pro file identi fication of a complex flexible object by robotic manipulation. The object is in the shape of the letter `Y’, chosen to resemble a living plant. The object is approximately modeled as a spring mass system. The robot manipulates the object with one or two arms, grasped at the ends of the `Y’, and makes visual measurements which locates the object’s position in space. Identi fication results from an optimization approach are compared for both one and two arm manipulation and sensing with and without vision. The results are not consistent with the expected physical object’s properties due to a failure to observe the motion dependence between the object’s connected segments. The result provides insight into the problem of assessing the minimal information needed to identify the stiff ness of a flexible object, an issue of importance to automated approaches.

T. Caldwell, D. Coleman, N. Correll (2014): Optimal Parameter Identification for Discrete Mechanical Systems with Application to Flexible Object Manipulation. In: IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), 2014.
We present a method for system identification of flexible objects by measuring forces and displacement during
interaction with a manipulating arm. We model the object’s structure and flexibility by a chain of rigid bodies connected
by torsional springs. Unlike previous work, the proposed optimal control approach using variational integrators allows identification of closed loops, which include the robot arm itself. This allows using the resulting models for planning in configuration space of the robot. In order to solve the resulting problem efficiently, we develop a novel method for fast discretetime adjoint-based gradient calculation. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated using full physics simulation in trep and using data recorded from a 7-DOF series elastic robot arm.
baxter_table
M. Kasper, N. Correll, T. Yeh (2014): Abstracting Perception and Manipulation in End-User Robot Programming using Sikuli. In: IEEE International Conference on Technologies for Practical Robot Applications (TePRA), Boston, MA, 2014.
We propose a programming paradigm for robotics that has the potential to drastically facilitate robotic programming. Building up on Sikuli, a GUI automation language, we abstract specific robotic perception and control capabilities into first-class objects that are embedded in a simple scripting language. Currently, robotics programming requires a deep understanding of perception, controls and algorithms, knowledge of a specific robot’s perception capabilities and kinematics, and finally a substantial amount of software engineering. Although learn-by-demonstration allows also relatively unskilled users to adapt a robot to their needs, this approach is intrinsically limited by the complexity such a program can reach. This paper presents a proof-of-concept for migrating Sikuli from the virtual GUI workspace of computer software to the physical 3D workspace of robotics. It then presents an example use case that illustrates the power of this new approach using a simple script that arranges a set of randomly aligned blocks into a tower using a Baxter robot equipped with an Asus Xtion Pro.
 
N. Correll, N. Arechiga, A. Bolger, M. Bollini, B. Charrow, A. Clayton, F. Dominguez, K. Donahue, S. Dyar, L. Johnson, H. Liu, A. Patrikalakis, T. Robertson, J. Smith, D. Soltero, M. Tanner, L. White, D. Rus (2010): Building a Distributed Robot Garden. In: Intelligent Service Robots, Special Issue on Agricultural Robotics, 3 (4), pp. 219–232, 2010.
This paper describes the architecture and implementation of a distributed autonomous gardening system with applications in urban/indoor precision agriculture. The garden is a mesh network of robots and plants. The gardening robots are mobile manipulators with an eye-in-hand camera. They are capable of locating plants in the garden, watering them, and locating and grasping fruit. The plants are potted cherry tomatoes enhanced with sensors and computation to monitor their well-being (e.g. soil humidity, state of fruits) and with networking to communicate servicing requests to the robots. By embedding sensing, computation, and communication into the pots, task allocation in the system is de-centrally coordinated, which makes the system scalable and robust against the failure of a centralized agent. We describe the architecture of this system and present experimental results for navigation, object recognition, and manipulation as well as challenges that lie ahead toward autonomous precision agriculture with multi-robot teams.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 Responses to Manipulation

  1. […] otra parte, el científico sigue trabajando en una tecnología de jardín robotizado que desarrolló en 2009 en el Instituto Tecnológico de […]

  2. […] das part of the natural evolution of a project Correll and colleagues began in 2008 to create a robotic greenhouse. The project originally involved iRobot’s Roomba-like but more programmable Create robots. The […]

  3. […] das part of the natural evolution of a project Correll and colleagues began in 2008 to create a robotic greenhouse. The project originally involved iRobot’s Roomba-like but more programmable Create robots. The […]

  4. […] das part of the natural evolution of a project Correll and colleagues began in 2008 to create a robotic greenhouse. The project originally involved iRobot’s Roomba-like but more programmable Create robots. The […]

  5. SWARM ROBOTS CALLED ‘DROPLETS’ THE SIZE OF A GOLF BALL « GALACTIC CONNECTIONGALACTIC CONNECTION says:

    […] as part of the natural evolution of a project Correll and colleagues began in 2008 to create arobotic greenhouse. The project originally involved iRobot’s Roomba-like but more programmable Create robots. The […]

  6. […] number of folks were working on using robots to garden autonomously (http://correll.cs.colorado.edu/?page_id=225).  Gardening in particular and agriculture in general will be an interesting application of the […]

  7. nice initiative! a question about how plants “ask” for water: do you monitor water leaf status or soil water status? We work in monitoring water status in plant leaves, that’s why we are interested. Thanks

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